Puriri Term 3

Art Auction

For the auction at the Mexican Fiesta we made a collaborative piece of art. We found out how Piet Mondrian used colour and geometric design to make his abstract art and used a heart shape to make our pieces. We all had one of our hearts included in the final art piece.

 

Production

We were very busy this term getting ready for our school production (The Point). Everyone had a speaking part, so we had lines to learn as well as songs. We helped to make our ‘rock cape’ costumes by sewing our hoods using a sewing machine. We also had to make up a dance. We loved performing for the audience and are looking forward to the next production in 2 years time.

 

Poetry

We have been learning about different forms of poetry and would like to share some of our Haiku and Cinquains with you.

 

Bubble Art

We had fun blowing bubbles and then drawing them. Enjoy our wonderful pictures.

 

 

 

Kowhai Class in the Matahui School Production ‘The Point’

Congratulations Matahui School on a fantastic school production!

Kowhai class was in the forest scene for the production ‘The Point’.  We were autumn trees.  Here are  paintings of ourselves in costume,  photos and stories:

 

Matahui School is putting on a show called ‘The Point’.   I am an Autumn tree. I look sparkly with my leaves -orange and yellow. I say “We have a point!” I love to sing. The show is brilliant! By Charlotte
Our school did a play called ‘The Point”.  I am an Autumn tree.  I’ve got red and gold leaves on my headband.  They glisten.  It’s treetastic!  I’ve got leaves on my body.  They are gold.  I say “No, you didn’t think!’   I feel that the play was treetastic!  By Cameron
Matahui School is doing a show called ‘The Point’.  We are Autumn trees.  We have yellow and orange leaves, with sparkles.  I say “It’s a time of magic and excitement!”  I love the singing and the dancing.  By Emma
           I am an Autumn tree.  I liked how the parents were watching me.  I look sparkly with my Autumn leaves.  I say “Pointless!  Pointless!”  I felt happy because it was my first school show.  By Anna
     The show is fabulous.  I love the dance.  I say “Pointless! Pointless!”  I am an Autumn tree.  I have orange, brown, and red leaves all around me.  The show is cool.  By Phoenix.                                                                                         I am an Autumn tree.  I look like an Autumn tree, with orange leaves, yellow leaves, red leaves.  I say “Oh my boy!  You have a lot to learn.  Tell me, where are you three from?”  The show was cool.  By Callaway       I love how the people were clapping.  I am an Autumn tree.  I have yellow leaves on my head.  My favourite line is “Yep! It’s timing! Ha ha ha!”  I felt nervous and happy. By Aroha
Matahui School is putting on a show and we are Autumn trees.  I look sparkly like a tree.  I have a headband with sparkles on my headband.  We also have yellow leaves.  I like singing the song.  I say “No roots!  No roots?”  I feel happy and shy.  By Kaida
  I am an Autumn tree in the play.  I have Autumn leaves, yellow, red, orange.  I say “You and your dog will work like dogs.”  I was happy because my Mum was watching me.  By Saxon
  We are Autumn trees.  I have yellow leaves sparkling around me.  I have leaves sparkling in my hair.  I say “For the love of a horse, what are you trying to do?”  I felt scared and happy and brave.  By Payton
  I am a beautiful Autumn tree that sparkles.  I love being an Autumn tree that sparkles.  I say ‘You know, leaves like that do not just grow on trees.”  I like how we did the singing.  I wear yellow leaves around my body.  I looked great and fantastic.  I wear red leaves on my head band, sparkling up on my head.  I felt excited.    By Tyla.
  I am an Autumn tree.  I liked how the parents were watching us as Autumn trees.  I looked fabulous because I have golden leaves – they sparkle and shine.  That makes me feel proud of myself.  I say “For crying out loud, would you get out of there!”  The show was great!  By Darcy

THERE IS NO “I” IN TEAM….

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It is often said that… THERE IS NO “I” IN TEAM….

Two weeks ago, Leo Holley, Henrietta Davenport, Bridget McGirr and Hugo Bruning proudly represented
Matahui School at the first round of the EPRO8 challenge, which this year, was held in Katikati. They had
every reason to feel proud, as we are of their achievement because they won the event. An outstanding team
achievement and so I thought I would interview the students to see if the old adage is in fact true. Read on.

What made you all want to be of this team? It seemed like it would be fun, especially as you get the
chance to invent and experiment with making things like robots and other mechanical devices.

How did the team prepare for the challenge? (initial burst of haughty laughter). Actually we didn’t really
prepare which didn’t worry us – except Bridget. We probably should have because we would have been able
to save time because we would have had a better understanding of how to wire things up. We also wasted
time constructing some framing as we didn’t recognise the importance of using triangles in the construction
phase.

So given you didn’t prepare as well as you might have, why do you think you were so successful in
the end? We worked so well as a team. Everyone was good at something different so we were able to
divide up tasks and shared the responsibility of completing each challenge we faced. We listened to each
other without criticising. We collaborated and co-operated, probably better than some of the other teams.
When you learned you had won what emotions did you experience? A whole range – happiness;
excitement; surprise and delight.
Where will this success take you next? We will be heading to the semi-finals and if we do well there then
it will be on to the finals.

What do you think you learned from this experience? We need to do some preparation this time so that
we are more organised. We found out that we need to spend a little more time planning before we launch
into creating and making. And, we learned the value of effective teamwork.

So, it would seem that there is no “I in team, certainly not if you are in a Year 7/8 Matahui School EPRO8
team!

FOOTNOTE: According to the judge who scored the EPRO8 Challenge, the scores reached by the top
eight teams at the Katikati event was so high, that they would have scored in the top three at any of the
other events held thus far. WOW!

Year Seven and Eight students celebrate a great term at Matahui

What a wonderful term Team Kauri, the Year Seven and Eight students have had at Matahui School.

The students have been learning to build and learn within a team and advance their ability as leaders. This has been achieved through an amazing array of outdoor activities including two camps, and skill building activities such as swimming, a deep-water confidence day and kayak skill development at Waimarino.

We have studied of the life of William Shakespeare and written a short biography. Following this we traveled with the Year Five and Six students to Auckland to see ‘A Comedy of Errors’ at the Pop-up Globe Theatre.

Other E.O.T.C. experiences have included our infamous boat day and a whole school beach education day.

In the classroom we have focused our mathematics on number and algebra. There are several budding mathematicians! We have buddy read a book called ‘A race to the pole’, a chance for our accomplished readers to share with and support their peers. This book was also part of our inquiry this term which has focused on the motivation to discover and explore. The high standard of presentations that concluded the inquiry are well worth visiting the classroom to see.

THE NATURAL CURIOSITY OF CHILDREN = SCIENTISTS

Children have the capacity to demonstrate heightened curiosity and genuine interest in the world around them. They naturally show the propensity to explore, investigate and discover; they are in essence, scientists.

The way Matahui students connect to the environment may not necessarily be unique, but it is significant. They enjoy going outside and the school playground becomes a microcosm of scientific opportunities – a living laboratory. When I shared Saxon Russell’s story (which KVH weaved into the report below) with the students in each class and informed them that the beetle he had discovered at school might be a horticultural “nasty,” they headed out on an intense search.

Prior to leaving school a six year old student at Matahui School in Katikati found a stink bug nymph, had his mother take a photo and proudly showed the critter off to his Dad. Being the small world that it is, Dad’s work sometimes relates to the kiwifruit industry and he had been contacted in the past by KVH about the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) so knew to make a report.

Formal identification by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) found that the bug was a native Australian Green Shield Bug.

 This is a fantastic example of the great awareness of our environment, and all the living things in it (of which biosecurity is such an important element), being built up from the ground level by teachers and principals day-to-day in, and outside of the classroom. Raising public awareness is what we are all about, and our goal is for the whole country to form a team of 4.7 million biosecurity conscious New Zealanders by 2025. (Kiwifruit Vine Health 2018).

“Saxon the Scientist” and his scientific Matahui buddies hardly left a leaf unturned such was the excitement of the challenge to locate and carefully capture the beetle he had seen. Our Matahui scientists recognized the importance of the task ahead and became part of an authentic scientific process, one designed to carefully monitor our environment. They have certainly become biosecurity conscious watchdogs.

We must continue to nurture the innate curiosity of the children we teach and give them authentic ways to demonstrate scientific thinking and methodology, especially in relation to the environment. They will learn that their actions can have an immense impact on the way we care for and sustain the planet on which we live.

 

Come and meet Kowhai class 2018

Haere Mai! Welcome to Kowhai class.

Here are our self portraits using black paint on a backdrop of primary colours, then mixed together to make a secondary colour.

We have been learning to introduce ourselves and our age in Maori.

Ko Darcy toku ingoa.  E rima aku tau.

 

Ko Aroha toku ingoa.  E ono aku tau.

 

Ko Callaway toku ingoa.  E ono aku tau.

 

Ko Cameron toku ingoa.  E ono aku tau.

 

 

Ko Payton toku ingoa.  E ono aku tau.

 

 

Ko Kaida toku ingoa.  E ono aku tau.

 

 

Ko Charlotte toku ingoa.  E rima aku tau.

 

 

Ko Emma toku ingoa.  E rima aku tau.

 

 

KoTyla toku ingoa.  E rima aku tau.

 

 

Ko Anna toku ingoa.  E rima aku tau.

 

 

Ko Phoenix toku ingoa.  E rima aku tau.

 

Ko Saxon toku ingoa.  E ono aku tau.

Haere ra!

 

 

KA MURA, KA MURI – WALKING BACKWARDS INTO THE FUTURE

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I read an article by Steve Wheeler* in which he referred to a Maori saying… “Ka mura, Ka muri,” which means ‘walking backwards into the future’.

We recently attended a family  tangi up North where we farewelled Nuki Aldridge, one of the strongest voices for Ngapuhi. He channelled his energy into the affairs of the north and will be remembered for upholding “He Whakaputanga” – The Declaration of Independence. He was a man who consistently referenced the “old ways,” and tried his hardest to maintain traditions pre-European.

At the tangi many people spoke about Nuki. In honouring him, they also remembered their   ancestors, calling upon their wisdom to guide them in the future path they now needed to follow without Nuki at the forefront. They were in essence “walking back into the future.”

Perhaps as Wheeler suggests, when we consider the future, we should possibly follow the Maori tradition and build our upon our future by referencing the past. In the case of Matahui School, we should consider what has gone before, what has been achieved and the course the school has taken in providing an environment within which students are nurtured. Compared to other long standing independent schools, we are young, but we have a rich history we can draw upon.

Wheeler could have been writing about Matahui as this school has always; aimed to educate our children to be resilient, responsive critical and proactive; expected them to solve problems the world has bestowed upon them, as well as new problems of their own making; expected them to approach challenges collaboratively because the changing future will demand this; encouraged them to be creative and learn the lessons of failure and success as they in turn “walk backwards into their future.”

 

*Ref: http://www.steve-wheeler.co.uk/2017/11/walking-backwards-into-future.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+blogspot/cYWZ+(Learning+with+%27e%27s)

 

Puriri Term 2

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Airport Visit

On Tuesday the 21 June Puriri went on a class trip to the Classic Flyers Museum and Tauranga airport. We went in the Catalina flying boat and saw a spit fire. We saw an Air New Zealand plane take off and a big yellow fire engine. It sprayed water out of a big hose and from the bottom too.  We saw a skeleton of a glider plus a plane that looked like a shark. We had an awesome day. The class rode on an old fire engine for a tour of the airport. We also saw lots of planes that were being repaired.

By Denley, Lily and Keyarn

Buddies

Every Friday we get together with our Buddies from Year 7 & 8 (Kauri). This term we have been doing experiments about flight and playing Rippa Rugby with them. We have a lot of fun with them.

By Matilda, Olive and Bella

Cross Country

Every year we do a cross country race. The year 1-3 children run at school and the year 4-8 children run at Wakamarama School. We practise on the farm and orchard next to the school. Only Lily and Gabe were in the Year 3 race as everyone else was sick.

In the Year 4 race Polly came second. It was a really hard race across paddocks, up hills and through the bush and gorse bushes.

We were very tired at the end.

By Isabel and Abygale

Archaeological Dig

At lunchtimes we can go to the archaeological dig area. The dig site is where can dig up cool stuff. You need to get a kit with spades, sieves, trowels and brushes and then can pretend to be archaeologists and find treasure. We have found lots of interesting items.

By Mila and Asha

Go For It

Go for it is where we get to learn lots of fun sports. This term Sandy came to teach us soccer, volleyball and tennis skills. It is a lot of fun and we have learnt lots of new sports.

By Polly, Nikora  and Gabe

Inquiry

Our inquiry for term 2 has been about flight. We did a lot of experiments about air pressure, lift, thrust, weight and drag. We made all sorts of flying ‘machines’ and had a paper plane completion. We had to make one paper plane that could fly a long distance and one that could stay in the air a long time.

Denley’s plane flew the furthest and Isabel’s stayed in the air the longest.

By Emma-Poppy and James

Insect Art

During our inquiry unit we some pastel and paint insect art. We think our artworks are awesome.

 

 

Kowhai class explores character writing and portraits

Mum By Sam Danielle is my Mum. She has short hair and green eyes. She has a happy smile. I love going on bike rides to the marina with her. It is a special time for me and Mum. I love my Mum. She’s the best!
My sister is the best! By Kaida Haven is the best sister in the whole world. She is little. She is cuddly as a lamb. I am happy when my sister is happy.

Baby Bear By Cameron Baby Bear is happy in the morning. He is the littlest bear in the family. He plays with his kite. I feel sad because Goldilocks ate his porridge.
Mumma by Darcy Mumma is as cuddly as a bunny. She is so beautiful. She is as beautiful as a butterfly. I love my Mumma.
Dad By Saxon Dad is busy as a bee. Dad goes to different countries. I feel sad when Dad is gone and happy when Dad is back.

My Dad by Aroha
My dad is the strongest in the world.

My Dad is tall like a giraffe.

I love him and he loves me.

Aunty D by Blair

Aunty D is my Mum’s sister.

She has blue eyes. She has beautiful clothes.  She has long, blonde hair.  She is beautiful.

She spoils me by giving me treats. I help her in the farm.  

I love Aunty D. She buys chocolate.  I eat it with her.  I snap a piece off for her and me and we eat it all.

I feel happy when she is by me.  Aunty D is very kind.

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